12V DC Ammo Can Power Box v1.0


I wanted to build a custom rugged battery box on a budget for amateur radio communications and emergency charging. The ammo can was found in poor condition at an army surplus and was restored by sanding to remove rust, re-painting, and lubricating the rubber seal. I’m not yet satisfied with the internal fabrication and will continue to improve upon its design later. Future improvements to include: led switch, solar charge controller, improved mounting panel, volt/amp meter.

more photos below and materials list below…

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Amateur Radio Transmits 1000 Miles On Voice Power

Many of us tried the old “Two tin cans connected by a string” experiment as kids. [Michael Rainey, AA1TJ] never quite forgot it.  Back in 2009, he built “El Silbo”, a ham radio transmitter powered entirely by his voice. El Silbo is a Double Side Band (DSB) transmitter for 75 meters.

via Pocket http://hackaday.com/2013/11/26/amateur-radio-transmits-1000-miles-on-voice-power/

Get into HAM radio for $45 dollars

 Why should I get a HAM radio & license?300px-International_amateur_radio_symbol_svg

  • How will I communicate with friends/family in a disaster scenario when internet/cellular/land communications are disrupted?
  • Could I be helpful in coordinating and relaying messages related to emergency and disaster relief?

What is HAM radio?

  • Amateur radio (also called ham radio) is the use of designated radio frequency spectra for purposes of private recreation, non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, and emergency communication.

Do I need a license? Yes

  • There are 3 levels:
    • Technician – Entry Level – VHF/UHF & Limited HF privileges (pdf)
    • General – All tech privileges plus HF privileges (communicate around world) (pdf)
    • Extra – All General privileges + shorter call sign & additional HF privileges (pdf)

How much would it cost to get started? $45

Who can get a tech license? Is the test hard?

  • Just about anyone could take the technician’s exam and pass after putting forth a little effort studying and taking practice tests
    • For Moms, Dads, Sons, Daughters, Sisters, Grandparents, etc.. 8 years old and up
  • Learning morse code is no-longer a requirement
  • Basic math, no algebra or calculus required
  • Simple electronics